About – History

The modern-day Geelong Guild Athletic Club Incorporated is a vastly different club than when it was borne in 1908. The club has enjoyed much success over the years, none more so than in 1956 when six Guild members competed on the biggest stage in World, at the Melbourne Olympic Games on the MCG.

As the years pass, Geelong Guild continues to grow older, and at the same time foster, promote and develop its activities to a wider, more diverse community. Club elders provide leadership and stability, linking the past with future generations, now and to come.

1900’s

An Athletic Giant Is Born

On 13 July 1908 at a meeting held at the Guild Hall in Myers Street, the Geelong Presbyterian Guild Harries was formed as an athletic section of the Geelong Presbyterian Guild, a church group designed to cater for the interests of the city’s young men.

Seventeen-year-old Bervin Purnell had developed a liking for the sport of athletics and he believed that the sport could benefit the Guild, so it was from his urgings at a weekly general meeting a month earlier, where the idea began.

The Guild President, Mr David Griffiths was elected President at the inaugural meeting on 13 July 1908, and Bervin Purnell was elected Honorary Secretary and Treasurer. There were a number of major events that the Guild Harriers took part in within their first year including its first Association event held in Melbourne, and the organisation of a relay run from Geelong to Melbourne on 9 November 1908.
In 1909 a change of uniform was accepted, with the strip moving from an all-white shirt with a tartan sash, to a black singlet with a shield, which contained the synonymous rampant yellow lion, with the initials GPGH in each corner. A black skull cap with the same crest as the singlet was also adopted, with the original white shorts being retained.

1920’s

Rebuilding the Roar

The Guild Harriers re-formed in April 1920 and set itself the task of rebuilding the club to the pre-war success. Through the efforts of Bervin Purnell, now in his late twenties, along with sprinter Athol Wilson (who was killed during World War II) and Ray Apted, the Guild built up its numbers and then sought the strong competition it desired for success. Purnell returned as the clubs Secretary and Treasurer and remained in both positions until the 1940s while David Griffiths also returned as President, holding office until his death in 1941.

Three years after re-forming the Guild dominated the ‘C’ Grade competition in 1923/24 wining their first ever track premiership. The following season Guild were a powerhouse in the ‘B’ Grand competition remaining undefeated and taking out the premiership. In 1925, club Secretary Bervin Purnell was elected to become the clubs second Life Member and in the 1926/27 season Guild took out its first ever ‘A’ Grade premiership after a ‘run off’ had to be held to separate Guild and Glenhuntly. During November 1927, Max Kroger broke the Australasian pole vault record (11’7 ½”) and Ewan Davidson broke the Australian Record in the high jump (6’2 1/3”).

1940’s

Hit Again By War

Most of the thoughts that would consume the local general public and the nation in the 1940s were the raging conflicts in Europe and the Asia pacific region during World War II. David Griffiths was going into his 26th season as Guild President when his death on 19 September 1941 robbed the Geelong Guild AAC of their founding President, and an inspirational leader. 

The war years curtailed competition to a large degree, although championships still went ahead. The VAAA reported that over 2,100 members had served with the forces through these years, with 200 fatalities.

1960’s

A New Home & New Beginnings

Entering the new decade Guild would undergo a transformation and propel itself into the busiest period of its existence. A number of life members were elected in the sixties; Dave Warner (1960), R.W. Whiteside (1962), Rudi Hochreiter (1963), Judy Patching (1967), Frank Larkins (1967), Andy Beretta (1968), Heather Ballans (1968), Barbara Cameron (1969) and Lauren Johns (1969).

In January 1961 the Geelong City Council approved design plans for the cinder running track, drawn up by Rudi Hochreiter. Building could finally commence. Continual improvements and upgrading would continue throughout the years and on 7 October 1961 the difficult decision was made to withdraw from Melbourne competition to focus on building the clubs new home. 

On 23 March the administrative career of the clubs President and founding Secretary/Treasurer, Bervin Purnell came to a close after having given 55 years of loyal and dedicated service. 

In 1964, following the rejection the previous season of some younger boys to compete in senior athletics at Landy Filed because they were not 16, the movement now known nationally as Little Athletics was commenced at Landy Field. Some members of Geelong Guild involved themselves heavily in this area of athletics.

1980’s

The Changing Pace

Geelong Guild men and women’s sections merged in 1982, with Ron Palmer elected the first President of the combined club, and long serving women’s Secretary, Pat Agg, continuing in that role. Geelong Guild celebrated its 75th year on a Monday evening, 31 October 1983, at a dinner held at the Golf View Hotel. In 1983 Bill Wood was the Guilds first recipient of the VAAA Merti Award and in 1986 was given Life Membership of the State athletic association.

The club was notified in November 1986 that it was incorporated within the laws of the State of Victoria and would be known as ‘Geelong Guild Athletic Club Incorporated’, and in February 1989 it was agreed to change the men’s uniform to include black shorts in place of the existing white shorts. 

The greatest number of Life Members to date were elected during this decade, with seven in total; Robert Fossey (1983), Jo Masek (1983), Mr J. Searby (1986), Ron Palmer (1987), Roy Cunliffe (1987), Mr D. Haunstein (1987), and Mr K. Blunt (1988).

2000’s

Celebrating a Century

The new century dawned with all eyes focused towards Sydney and the Olympic Games. The second games for the nation. In the lead up to the Games, a number of current and former Guild members took part in the Olympic Torch Relay, including Judy Patching, Rudi Hochreiter and Trevor Billingham. 

In 2002 long serving officials Mela and Brian Russell, along with Pauline Zuccolin were awarded cub Life Membership, in 2004 Laurel and Rod Puls, and Patricia Hochrieter joined them, as did Robert van der Wilk in 2005 and he would later become the Secretary of the Guild’s Centenary Committee.

The 2006 Commonwealth Games at Melbourne were a much-anticipated event and Pauline Zuccolin was appointed a field events technical official, while volunteers included Angela Byrt, Mandi Cole, Simon Taylor and Robert van der Wilk. The final leg of the Queens relay baton was revealed as Guild Life Member, and then Victorian Governor, John Landy, who read the athletes oath fifty years before. Landy received a rousing ovation when he alighted the steps of the world-famous MCG and delivered the baton.

The Geelong City Council constructed a Geelong Legends Plaza at the entrance to the Geelong Football Club’s western stands in 2007. Two prominent Guild figures in John Landy and Trevor Billingham were included. 

A gathering of Life Members at Landy Field was held on the clubs 99th birthday to generate future interest in the clubs impending centenary. The Geelong Guild Centenary Dinner was held on 12 July 2008 with John Landy entertaining the attendees which totalled 140 or so. It was a wonderful evening where Geelong Guild members past and present came together and shared stories of what makes the Guild so great.

1910’s

Foundations, Fame & Failings

The start of the new decade saw the Guild Harriers successes continue and flourish, with many great athletic results, and a number of great social events being organised by the club. By 1912, financial troubles were commencing for the club with some committee members resigning due to moving away from the area. On 14 May the uniform was changed once again to navy blue, with green trimmings around the neck and sleeves with a ‘long G’ in maroon on the front, however by the end of the 1912/13 season the club had less than six ‘active’ members owing to a number of athletes also relocating to Melbourne.

On 9 May 1913 Bervin Purnell sent a letter to the Secretary of the Presbyterian Guild advising that the Harriers section was disbanding. What could not be foreseen was the onset of World War I and this combined with other factors conspired to keep the Guild Harriers in recess until 1920. 

Two prominent Geelong athletes did not return home from the War, having gone to fight for Australia and the Empire. Joe Slater, the Christ Church sprint champion died, as did the Guilds Adrian Ambrose ‘Mac’ Connor, who died of wounds received at Fleurbaix, France on 30 July 1916. Bervin Purcell also enlisted for the war and was stationed in England until 1919.

1930’s

A Change Of Name

The Guild entered the 1930s continuing to build up both its athletic and social pursuits. From 102 members in 1930/31 the club reached a pre-war peak of 131 members in 1935/36. A club newsletter under the title of ‘Rum Runner’ was started in 1933 and entrusted to Mr E.R. Gray. 

At a club committee meeting on 6 August it was agreed to purchase land adjoining the Guild Hall, with a view to creating an athletic training track for the club. The cost of this land was 600 pounds, but in May 1936 the committee sought to sell the land in Myers St for the best possible price. The club celebrated its 30th anniversary on 27 July 1938.

1950’s

Miles & An Olympic Dream

The 1950s captivates the Geelong community and the Guild athletic family not only locally but state wide, nationally and now the rampant lion would appear on the world stage. Club President Bervin Purnell was now the Mayor of Geelong and this also drew some favourable attention and focus upon the club.

John Landy lowered the Victorian one mile record to 4:14.6 on 10 November 1951 at Olympic Park, and he then went on to represent Australia at the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games. Later that year, Landy set the middle-distance running world alight with an Australian record and the worlds fastest mile (4:02.1) since 1945. In the 1954 European summer the mile was run for the first time under 4 minutes, but it would be Englands Roger Bannister that would achieve that honour first when he ran 3:49.4 on 6 May 1954. A month later Landy smashed Bannisters world record with a time of 3:57.9 on 21 June 1954.

During November 1955 the original Geelong Guild Womens Amateur Athletic Club was formed with Mrs Phyllis Mills as President and Mrs Lucy Bennet acted as Secretary. 

On 22 November 1956 the Olympic Games were opened by HRH the Duke of Edinburgh at the MCG in front of 103,000 people, with John Landy reading the oath on behalf of all competing athletes. Geelong Guild were fortunate to have six of their members announced in the Australia team (which made up 10% of the team); Ron Blackney (3000m steeplechase), John Chittick (110m hurdles), Bob Joyce (110m hurdles), John Landy (1500m & 5000m), Don Macmillan (800m) and John Vernon (high jump). John Landy was the only Guild athlete to make a final and he won a bronze medal in the 1500m. Landy was inducted as the third Life Member of the Geelong Guild in April of 1958 and Bill Wood was to become the fourth in 1959.

On Saturday 12 July 1958, the Geelong Guild celebrated its golden anniversary with a dinner at the Geelong West Town Hall. The previous day, the Geelong Advertiser dedicated its entire back page to an article entitled ‘Geelong Guild looks back on 50 years of great achievements’. A plea for financial assistance was made to those assembled, to help construct the clubs largest ever project, an International standard athletic track for Geelong. In October 1959 John Landy wrote to the Guild allowing the club to use his name for the clubs’ new home, on the northern bank of the Barwon River.

1970’s

From Cinders To Synthetic

An independent committee took over the running and management of Landy Field from the Geelong Guild mens committee. This committee evolved over the years to the John Landy Field Management Committee which was led by many years by Geelong Guild Life Member, Ron Palmer. Saturday 20 November 1976 was the last time athletes would race on the cinders at Landy Field with a new “all-weather” rubberised bitumen surface went down which would remain in place for 16 years.

Four Life Members were elected in the 70s with Harry Wynhoven in 1972, Pat Agg in 1975, Frank Searby in 1978 and Russell Sarah in 1979. While Mick McGrath was selected in Australian team for the 1972 Munich Olympics in the triple jump, while at the end of the 1977-78 summer season the club held its first ever combined presentation night for men and women, a sign of the times and of things to come.

1990’s

A Return to Melbourne

The grandfather of Landy Field, Bill Wood died at the age of 83 on 8 June 1990 and a little over a year later Guild suffered the loss of another Life Member in Frank Searby on 21 July 1991. In the 1990/91 season Guild re-entered the Melbourne interclub competition, as a combined Centre with other Geelong clubs, ending nearly a 30 year break when Guild left the competition to establish Landy Field. Mrs J Searby (1990), Peter Fossey (1991), Joyce Lockyer (1998) and Mandi Cole (1998) were awarded Life Memberships across the course of this decade.

During 1992/93 Landy Field is developed into an eight-lane international standard facility and a new brick competition office is opened at Landy Field, replacing the older timber structure and is named after Ron Palmer in January 1998.

2010’s

The Dawning Of A New Era

The 2010’s saw a new era at Geelong Guild with a stable and dedicated group of administrators slowly but surely increasing both membership numbers and the bank balance over the course of the decade. Robert van der Wilk was a constant across the decade, starting as President before moving into the role of Treasurer. A heavy focus on the relay program led to an increase in recruitment of Little Athletes into the Guild senior ranks, and enthusiastic Team Managers Paul Spikers and Matthew Wade, who ended the decade as President played a key role in the re-development of club culture. Mandi Cole who had been awarded Life Membership two decade before, also played a key role as Coaching Coordinator, in developing not only athletes during this time, but developing fellow coaches who were then able to take on training squads in their own right.

Five life members were elected through the decade, with Lyn Taylor (2010), David Fossey (2010), Nicole Spehar (2010), Andrew Bews (2012), and Greg Puls (2017) honoured for their various contributions to the Guild over the years.

At the end of the decade registration numbers of both Senior and Little Athletics components of the club were over the 100 mark, a stark difference to the athlete numbers that were down below 30 at the start of the decade. A new, young group of athletes continue to push the club forward in interclub and state and national competition, and a committed team of coaches continue to provide them with the best possible platform from which to succeed. 

1900’s

An Athletic Giant Is Born

On 13 July 1908 at a meeting held at the Guild Hall in Myers Street, the Geelong Presbyterian Guild Harries was formed as an athletic section of the Geelong Presbyterian Guild, a church group designed to cater for the interests of the city’s young men.

Seventeen-year-old Bervin Purnell had developed a liking for the sport of athletics and he believed that the sport could benefit the Guild, so it was from his urgings at a weekly general meeting a month earlier, where the idea began.

The Guild President, Mr David Griffiths was elected President at the inaugural meeting on 13 July 1908, and Bervin Purnell was elected Honorary Secretary and Treasurer. There were a number of major events that the Guild Harriers took part in within their first year including its first Association event held in Melbourne, and the organisation of a relay run from Geelong to Melbourne on 9 November 1908.
In 1909 a change of uniform was accepted, with the strip moving from an all-white shirt with a tartan sash, to a black singlet with a shield, which contained the synonymous rampant yellow lion, with the initials GPGH in each corner. A black skull cap with the same crest as the singlet was also adopted, with the original white shorts being retained.

1910’s

Foundations, Fame & Failings

The start of the new decade saw the Guild Harriers successes continue and flourish, with many great athletic results, and a number of great social events being organised by the club. By 1912, financial troubles were commencing for the club with some committee members resigning due to moving away from the area. On 14 May the uniform was changed once again to navy blue, with green trimmings around the neck and sleeves with a ‘long G’ in maroon on the front, however by the end of the 1912/13 season the club had less than six ‘active’ members owing to a number of athletes also relocating to Melbourne.

On 9 May 1913 Bervin Purnell sent a letter to the Secretary of the Presbyterian Guild advising that the Harriers section was disbanding. What could not be foreseen was the onset of World War I and this combined with other factors conspired to keep the Guild Harriers in recess until 1920. 

Two prominent Geelong athletes did not return home from the War, having gone to fight for Australia and the Empire. Joe Slater, the Christ Church sprint champion died, as did the Guilds Adrian Ambrose ‘Mac’ Connor, who died of wounds received at Fleurbaix, France on 30 July 1916. Bervin Purcell also enlisted for the war and was stationed in England until 1919.

1920’s

Rebuilding the Roar

The Guild Harriers re-formed in April 1920 and set itself the task of rebuilding the club to the pre-war success. Through the efforts of Bervin Purnell, now in his late twenties, along with sprinter Athol Wilson (who was killed during World War II) and Ray Apted, the Guild built up its numbers and then sought the strong competition it desired for success. Purnell returned as the clubs Secretary and Treasurer and remained in both positions until the 1940s while David Griffiths also returned as President, holding office until his death in 1941.

Three years after re-forming the Guild dominated the ‘C’ Grade competition in 1923/24 wining their first ever track premiership. The following season Guild were a powerhouse in the ‘B’ Grand competition remaining undefeated and taking out the premiership. In 1925, club Secretary Bervin Purnell was elected to become the clubs second Life Member and in the 1926/27 season Guild took out its first ever ‘A’ Grade premiership after a ‘run off’ had to be held to separate Guild and Glenhuntly. During November 1927, Max Kroger broke the Australasian pole vault record (11’7 ½”) and Ewan Davidson broke the Australian Record in the high jump (6’2 1/3”).

1930’s

A Change Of Name

The Guild entered the 1930s continuing to build up both its athletic and social pursuits. From 102 members in 1930/31 the club reached a pre-war peak of 131 members in 1935/36. A club newsletter under the title of ‘Rum Runner’ was started in 1933 and entrusted to Mr E.R. Gray. 

At a club committee meeting on 6 August it was agreed to purchase land adjoining the Guild Hall, with a view to creating an athletic training track for the club. The cost of this land was 600 pounds, but in May 1936 the committee sought to sell the land in Myers St for the best possible price. The club celebrated its 30th anniversary on 27 July 1938.

1940’s

Hit Again By War

Most of the thoughts that would consume the local general public and the nation in the 1940s were the raging conflicts in Europe and the Asia pacific region during World War II. David Griffiths was going into his 26th season as Guild President when his death on 19 September 1941 robbed the Geelong Guild AAC of their founding President, and an inspirational leader. 

The war years curtailed competition to a large degree, although championships still went ahead. The VAAA reported that over 2,100 members had served with the forces through these years, with 200 fatalities.

1950’s

Miles & An Olympic Dream

The 1950s captivates the Geelong community and the Guild athletic family not only locally but state wide, nationally and now the rampant lion would appear on the world stage. Club President Bervin Purnell was now the Mayor of Geelong and this also drew some favourable attention and focus upon the club.

John Landy lowered the Victorian one mile record to 4:14.6 on 10 November 1951 at Olympic Park, and he then went on to represent Australia at the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games. Later that year, Landy set the middle-distance running world alight with an Australian record and the worlds fastest mile (4:02.1) since 1945. In the 1954 European summer the mile was run for the first time under 4 minutes, but it would be Englands Roger Bannister that would achieve that honour first when he ran 3:49.4 on 6 May 1954. A month later Landy smashed Bannisters world record with a time of 3:57.9 on 21 June 1954.

During November 1955 the original Geelong Guild Womens Amateur Athletic Club was formed with Mrs Phyllis Mills as President and Mrs Lucy Bennet acted as Secretary. 

On 22 November 1956 the Olympic Games were opened by HRH the Duke of Edinburgh at the MCG in front of 103,000 people, with John Landy reading the oath on behalf of all competing athletes. Geelong Guild were fortunate to have six of their members announced in the Australia team (which made up 10% of the team); Ron Blackney (3000m steeplechase), John Chittick (110m hurdles), Bob Joyce (110m hurdles), John Landy (1500m & 5000m), Don Macmillan (800m) and John Vernon (high jump). John Landy was the only Guild athlete to make a final and he won a bronze medal in the 1500m. Landy was inducted as the third Life Member of the Geelong Guild in April of 1958 and Bill Wood was to become the fourth in 1959.

On Saturday 12 July 1958, the Geelong Guild celebrated its golden anniversary with a dinner at the Geelong West Town Hall. The previous day, the Geelong Advertiser dedicated its entire back page to an article entitled ‘Geelong Guild looks back on 50 years of great achievements’. A plea for financial assistance was made to those assembled, to help construct the clubs largest ever project, an International standard athletic track for Geelong. In October 1959 John Landy wrote to the Guild allowing the club to use his name for the clubs’ new home, on the northern bank of the Barwon River.

1960’s

A New Home & New Beginnings

Entering the new decade Guild would undergo a transformation and propel itself into the busiest period of its existence. A number of life members were elected in the sixties; Dave Warner (1960), R.W. Whiteside (1962), Rudi Hochreiter (1963), Judy Patching (1967), Frank Larkins (1967), Andy Beretta (1968), Heather Ballans (1968), Barbara Cameron (1969) and Lauren Johns (1969).

In January 1961 the Geelong City Council approved design plans for the cinder running track, drawn up by Rudi Hochreiter. Building could finally commence. Continual improvements and upgrading would continue throughout the years and on 7 October 1961 the difficult decision was made to withdraw from Melbourne competition to focus on building the clubs new home. 

On 23 March the administrative career of the clubs President and founding Secretary/Treasurer, Bervin Purnell came to a close after having given 55 years of loyal and dedicated service. 

In 1964, following the rejection the previous season of some younger boys to compete in senior athletics at Landy Filed because they were not 16, the movement now known nationally as Little Athletics was commenced at Landy Field. Some members of Geelong Guild involved themselves heavily in this area of athletics.

1970’s

From Cinders To Synthetic

An independent committee took over the running and management of Landy Field from the Geelong Guild mens committee. This committee evolved over the years to the John Landy Field Management Committee which was led by many years by Geelong Guild Life Member, Ron Palmer. Saturday 20 November 1976 was the last time athletes would race on the cinders at Landy Field with a new “all-weather” rubberised bitumen surface went down which would remain in place for 16 years.

Four Life Members were elected in the 70s with Harry Wynhoven in 1972, Pat Agg in 1975, Frank Searby in 1978 and Russell Sarah in 1979. While Mick McGrath was selected in Australian team for the 1972 Munich Olympics in the triple jump, while at the end of the 1977-78 summer season the club held its first ever combined presentation night for men and women, a sign of the times and of things to come.

1980’s

The Changing Pace

Geelong Guild men and women’s sections merged in 1982, with Ron Palmer elected the first President of the combined club, and long serving women’s Secretary, Pat Agg, continuing in that role. Geelong Guild celebrated its 75th year on a Monday evening, 31 October 1983, at a dinner held at the Golf View Hotel. In 1983 Bill Wood was the Guilds first recipient of the VAAA Merti Award and in 1986 was given Life Membership of the State athletic association.

The club was notified in November 1986 that it was incorporated within the laws of the State of Victoria and would be known as ‘Geelong Guild Athletic Club Incorporated’, and in February 1989 it was agreed to change the men’s uniform to include black shorts in place of the existing white shorts. 

The greatest number of Life Members to date were elected during this decade, with seven in total; Robert Fossey (1983), Jo Masek (1983), Mr J. Searby (1986), Ron Palmer (1987), Roy Cunliffe (1987), Mr D. Haunstein (1987), and Mr K. Blunt (1988).

1990’s

A Return to Melbourne

The grandfather of Landy Field, Bill Wood died at the age of 83 on 8 June 1990 and a little over a year later Guild suffered the loss of another Life Member in Frank Searby on 21 July 1991. In the 1990/91 season Guild re-entered the Melbourne interclub competition, as a combined Centre with other Geelong clubs, ending nearly a 30 year break when Guild left the competition to establish Landy Field. Mrs J Searby (1990), Peter Fossey (1991), Joyce Lockyer (1998) and Mandi Cole (1998) were awarded Life Memberships across the course of this decade.

During 1992/93 Landy Field is developed into an eight-lane international standard facility and a new brick competition office is opened at Landy Field, replacing the older timber structure and is named after Ron Palmer in January 1998.

2000’s

Celebrating a Century

The new century dawned with all eyes focused towards Sydney and the Olympic Games. The second games for the nation. In the lead up to the Games, a number of current and former Guild members took part in the Olympic Torch Relay, including Judy Patching, Rudi Hochreiter and Trevor Billingham. 

In 2002 long serving officials Mela and Brian Russell, along with Pauline Zuccolin were awarded cub Life Membership, in 2004 Laurel and Rod Puls, and Patricia Hochrieter joined them, as did Robert van der Wilk in 2005 and he would later become the Secretary of the Guild’s Centenary Committee.

The 2006 Commonwealth Games at Melbourne were a much-anticipated event and Pauline Zuccolin was appointed a field events technical official, while volunteers included Angela Byrt, Mandi Cole, Simon Taylor and Robert van der Wilk. The final leg of the Queens relay baton was revealed as Guild Life Member, and then Victorian Governor, John Landy, who read the athletes oath fifty years before. Landy received a rousing ovation when he alighted the steps of the world-famous MCG and delivered the baton.

The Geelong City Council constructed a Geelong Legends Plaza at the entrance to the Geelong Football Club’s western stands in 2007. Two prominent Guild figures in John Landy and Trevor Billingham were included. 

A gathering of Life Members at Landy Field was held on the clubs 99th birthday to generate future interest in the clubs impending centenary. The Geelong Guild Centenary Dinner was held on 12 July 2008 with John Landy entertaining the attendees which totalled 140 or so. It was a wonderful evening where Geelong Guild members past and present came together and shared stories of what makes the Guild so great.

2010’s

The Dawning Of A New Era

The 2010’s saw a new era at Geelong Guild with a stable and dedicated group of administrators slowly but surely increasing both membership numbers and the bank balance over the course of the decade. Robert van der Wilk was a constant across the decade, starting as President before moving into the role of Treasurer. A heavy focus on the relay program led to an increase in recruitment of Little Athletes into the Guild senior ranks, and enthusiastic Team Managers Paul Spikers and Matthew Wade, who ended the decade as President played a key role in the re-development of club culture. Mandi Cole who had been awarded Life Membership two decade before, also played a key role as Coaching Coordinator, in developing not only athletes during this time, but developing fellow coaches who were then able to take on training squads in their own right.

Five life members were elected through the decade, with Lyn Taylor (2010), David Fossey (2010), Nicole Spehar (2010), Andrew Bews (2012), and Greg Puls (2017) honoured for their various contributions to the Guild over the years.

At the end of the decade registration numbers of both Senior and Little Athletics components of the club were over the 100 mark, a stark difference to the athlete numbers that were down below 30 at the start of the decade. A new, young group of athletes continue to push the club forward in interclub and state and national competition, and a committed team of coaches continue to provide them with the best possible platform from which to succeed.